Are You Too Young for a Stroke? Know the Signs and Symptoms.

May 24, 2019 Providence Health Team

When actor Luke Perry passed away earlier this year after suffering a stroke at age 52, many people were shocked and saddened by the news. How could this happen to someone so young?

With the National Stroke Association estimating a 44% increase in the number of young Americans hospitalized for stroke, there’s no better time than the present to find out what you can do to minimize risks for yourself and your loved ones.

What is a stroke?

A stroke happens when blood stops flowing to an area of the brain. Strokes can create problems with speech, memory or walking, and can sometimes cause death.

There are two types of stroke:

Ischemic stroke – happens when a blood clot blocks blood flow to the brain.

Hemorrhagic stroke – happens when a blood vessel in the brain bursts, causing blood to fill the area around the brain and damage cells. These are less common but more deadly.

An Ischemic Stroke, Source: National Institutes of Health

How can you lower your stroke risk?

Although you can’t control your family history, you can be aware of it and make healthy lifestyle changes to avoid the possibility of a stroke happening to you (like it did for Aunt Sally). So, dig deep into your family tree and find out what conditions might be lurking – and adjust now to lower your risk.

The great news is that up to 80% of strokes are preventable with a healthy lifestyle. Here are a few tips to add to the list:

Eat a healthy diet. A well-balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins can help you keep a healthy weight and lower your risk for high cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

Exercise regularly. Regular exercise can help reduce your risk for chronic diseases (like diabetes) that increase stroke risk. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week, 75 minutes of vigorous exercise, or a combination of both.

Quit smoking. Smoking doubles your risk of stroke. Talk to your doctor about ways to quit. You can also check out these smoking cessation resources.  

Drink in moderation. Too much alcohol can increase your blood pressure and your risk for stroke. Men should aim to drink no more than two alcoholic drinks per day and women should have no more than one drink per day.

In addition to these lifestyle changes, it’s also important to maintain an open dialogue with your doctor, especially if you have any of these medical conditions:

  • High blood pressure - can weaken major blood vessels and reduce blood flow.
  • Atrial fibrillation (AFib) - allows blood to pool in the heart, forming clots that can travel to the brain.
  • Diabetes - is often linked to other stroke risk factors, like high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
  • High cholesterol - can block normal blood flow to the brain.
  • Circulation problems (such as atherosclerosis) - can clog arteries and block blood flow to the brain.

What are the signs of a stroke?

If someone is having a stroke, every second counts to reduce brain damage. That’s why it’s important to think F.A.S.T. and call 911 immediately.

Face drooping – is their smile uneven?

Arm weakness – is one arm weak or numb?

Speech – is their speech slurred?

Time to call 911.

Other symptoms of stroke can include sudden:

  • Confusion or difficulty understanding speech
  • Trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Severe headache
  • Numbness in the face, leg or arm, especially on one side of the body
  • Trouble walking or loss of coordination

Although a stroke can happen at any age, you can lower the possibility for you and your loved ones by knowing your risk factors and making healthy lifestyle changes now. Find out if you are at risk by taking our stroke risk assessment—it only takes five minutes!

If you are looking for a primary care doctor, you can find one using our provider directory. Or you can search for one in your area:

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