New phase I immuno-oncology study for HPV16+ cancers

Image credit: UCSF Health

An unmet clinical need exists for patients with cancers associated with human papillomavirus. A new phase I study at Providence Cancer Institute will evaluate a novel biologic therapy in patients with recurrent, locally advanced or metastatic human papillomavirus strain 16 positive (HPV16+) solid tumors:

SQZ-PBMC-HPV as Monotherapy and in Combination with Atezolizumab in HPV16+ Solid Tumors

In this open-label, multicenter study, investigators will evaluate the safety, dose escalation and dose expansion of SQZ-PBMC-HPV, an investigational antigen-presenting cell therapy directed against the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV16.

The investigational agent will be tested as monotherapy and in combination with atezolizumab (Tecentriq), an approved checkpoint inhibitor. Immunogenic effects and antitumor activity will also be studied.

For more information or to enroll a patient, call our Clinical Research office at 503-215-2614.

See more studies

Providence Cancer Institute offers one of the most robust portfolios of early phase cancer clinical research on the West Coast. Early phase studies of immunotherapies, targeted therapies and other novel investigational agents are supported by our dedicated team of oncology nurses, research associates and coordinators.

New research studies are added frequently. Please visit our website to view studies for all cancer types currently open at Providence Cancer Institute.

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